Johnny’s Talk – Concert Rules

The first time I went to a Johnny’s concert back in 2009, I had no idea about concert manners. I didn’t understand why people held these things with messages or people’s faces on them (later finding out they were called “Uchiwas”) and waved glow sticks in unison (called penlights) or why there were no photos allowed inside the venue. Over the years, I learned the concert manners and now understand why these things, and many others, happen. In this post, I will discuss some major concert rules and why they are there.

No Photography or Video allowed During the Concert or in the Venue.

The number one thing you will notice when you get in line for a Johnny’s concert is that they search your bag. During this check they ask you if you have a camera, the reason being you are not allowed to take pictures or videos during concerts. This is one of the biggest rules that might be a huge contrast to your own home country. In America, and many other countries, you are allowed to take video and pictures during a concert or inside the venue. In Japan for the most part you can’t, even for concerts outside Johnny’s. This doesn’t mean as a visitor to Japan and as a foreigner that this rule doesn’t apply to you though.

The reason for no pictures or videos during the concert or inside the venue is because they don’t want anything shared on social media or to be shared without their consent. This may seem constraining, but that is how the Japanese music industry works. In return, they usually release a DVD and official pictures. Another reason is etiquette, holding a camera up in the air the whole concert may mean blocking other people’s view around you. In some venues, cameras are also seen as a health and safety hazard.

Uchiwa Etiquette

Uchiwas are those things that fans hold with the member’s faces on it or a message written on it. In a concert in America, you are allowed to make signs or something to hold during a concert, but since they are too big, Japan uses Uchiwas to do the same thing. Now, these Uchiwas are not allowed to be held over your face or be more than the typical Uchiwa size. If you do not know the size of an uchiwa and want to make one, click here for the proper dimensions.

The reason that these rules are in place is because if you raise the Uchiwa over your head, it blocks the view of the person behind you and ruins the concert experience for them. This also goes for the amount of Uchiwas you hold at the same time. You are only allowed to hold 2 Uchiwas at a time in your hands, as it will block the person to the side and behind you from seeing properly.

Stay in your Assigned Seat

As a health and safety standard, as well as to keep things orderly and to protect the safety of the talents, stay in your assigned seat. Even if you are on the end of a row, don’t step out into the aisle. Also, don’t run to catch any streamers that are falling further away from your seat.

Listen to the Venue Staff

The staff members are in the venue for a reason, to help direct the audience and make sure everything is in order. You will see the staff members everywhere, and they will also be directing you to where to go and what to do. When you are in and around the venue, follow their instructions. They are the people holding the signs that tell you to take no pictures in the venue and also direct you if you need help. If they approach you about something, please be respectful and do what they say. The staff do not bother you if you aren’t doing something out of line. I am not perfect about this, and I have snapped at a staff member before, but also know that they are just doing their job.

I hope you guys have enjoyed this post and give it a like if you found it helpful! Please let me know in the comments below what you think and if you have any other things to add from your experience.

6 thoughts on “Johnny’s Talk – Concert Rules

  1. kei1985 says:

    The stay in your seat and the streamer thing is kind of funny tho because japanese fans don’t follow that. People in the aisles move to the side, not a huge lot, but when I went to Miyagi to see Arashi I noticed almost everyone was doing it. And the streamer thing, last time in Kanjanism in Nagoya this lady was pushing me and my friend before the streamers so she could have a better chance and then the lady behind me started pulling one side of one and wrapped me around and almost made me fall. And in Osaka this other lady put a foot over a chair in the arena and jumped over everyone’s heads to get a streamer to then basically fall on her side probably hurting herself. Streamers are a big deal!

    Like

    • nihonchique says:

      It’s very true! Some of the Japanese fans don’t follow the rules either, not just running for streamers. Streamers are a big deal and its so dangerous when people are just doing anything in their power to grab them.

      Like

  2. Patricia says:

    Hello! Thanks so much for this post as well as for the video that you made. It’s been very helpful since I’ll be going for my first Johnny’s concert in Osaka tomorrow.

    I was just wondering, would you say Johnny’s WEST really popular in Japan? I will be going for their evening show tomorrow and was wondering if I should go really in the morning to queue for goods or during their afternoon show, and as you said the line may be empty. i just wanna buy the T shirt and penlight and was wondering if those goods are popular enough to be the first to be sold out first?

    Sorry for asking this so last minute since the concert is tomorrow but it’s okay if you can’t reply quickly! ^^; Thank you in advance. 🙂

    Like

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