Nail Salons and Nail Art in Japan

 

Getting my nails done in Japan is one of my favorite things to do. More specifically a manicure with nail art. It’s one of my little pieces of joy to see my nails nice and manicured and it makes me feel so put together in most situations.

I first started getting manicures when I was a young girl, but it wasn’t until I came to Japan that I really did “Nail Art”. Even then, I didn’t do it on a consistent basis, but since I started working I find it a nice little splurge every month to get my nails nicely manicured.

 

My nail salon of choice? A chain called Speed Nail. This was the first place that I found when I came here to Japan and I have been hooked ever since. Now, I know that nail art can be pretty intense here in Japan, but I am on the more conservative side for work purposes, so this salon is good for me and for my needs.They give me the right amount of nail art that I prefer, as well as, I can talk to the staff each time and they give me suggestions.

I go to the flagship store in Umeda, in Osaka Japan but since they are a chain, they are all around Japan. I used to go to one of the two salons in Kyoto when I lived there for 2 years and then started to go to the Umeda location when I moved to Osaka back in November of 2014.

In Japan, it is gel nail polish that they use, more specifically they actually use a pot of gel that they actually paint on to your nails, versus shellac that is more like a traditional nail polish. The pot method actually makes it easier to do nail art and customize it, rather than just plain color.

Also, the stones on nails seem that they would fall off easily, but they do not at all. I was skeptical about it at first, but it really does work. The method of using the pot of gel to paint the nails has the ability completely seal in the stone on the nails and they do not move at all, even for about 5 weeks. I was very impressed with the results!

 

 

Another concern would be, how safe is it for your nails to do this every month? The answer is that there are 3 types of gels that they use at this particular salon (and most salons I believe). I use the type that is the most gentle on the nails. With this being said though, each time they take off the gel nails, they do grind your nail down a bit. If you have thin nails, then getting them done every month like me might not be a good option.

Here are some more examples of the Nail Art that I have done while I have been here in Japan:

 

 

 

What do you think about Japanese Nail Art? Let me know in the comments below!

 

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Japanese Fashion- Fashion Diary: Spring Blues

The weather has been warming up over the past month in Japan and the Cherry Blossoms have all dropped their petals. Now that warmer weather is upon us, it’s time to break out the Spring Fashion! Blue has been my favorite color to wear this spring, and pairing it with lighter colors, like white and grey, I think is an amazing combination. Fashion-1 Coordinate 1: Top: Earth Music and Ecology Skirt: Noela Fahsion-2 This First outfit is one of my favorite to wear to work. I love the white color and the flower print of the skirt. The shirt is blue, giving contrast to the white, but bringing out the blue and grey flowers in the skirt. The shirt has a white collar and cuffs, which compliments the white of the skirt against the blue shirt. Fashion-3If you look closely, there is pink in the flowers of the skirt too! I have always been a fan of flower print, but this Spring and Summer Flower print is one of the major trends here in Japan. You can see it in dresses, skirts, and tops everywhere in stores recently.     Fashion-6 Coordinate 2: Skirt and Top: Noela Fashion-5I was never into Tule skirts until last Fall. I always thought that they were too poofy for my style and were hard to wear. That all changed with my first purchase of a tule skirt last fall, and now this skirt that I have in this coordinate. A HUGE trend in Japan right now is midi-length tule skirts. This top is a light sweater that is grey white stripped, which again gives a contrast to the navy blue skirt. Fashion-4This Tule skirt is so feminine, but conservative at the same time so that I can wear it to work. I am only 150cm, or 4’11, so this skirt may seem to be a bit on the long side, but it hits me right under the knees and the underskirt is just at my knees, making it the perfect length for this midi-skirt trend. Fashion-9Coordinate #3 Cardigan and Dress: Earth Music and Ecology Fashion-8This dress is actually one that has been in my closet from last year and was part of the Ray x NEWS x Earth Music and Ecology 3 way collaboration. Even though it is a year old, you can never go wrong with an A-line dress that is a bit longer for work. I think it is classy and a piece that can stay in your closet for years and never go out of style. The dress also came with the belt, and it cinches in the waist very nicely. It was also reasonably priced, at around 7000 Yen. For Japanese Fashion, Earth Music and Ecology makes good quality clothes for a reasonable price, compared to some other brands in department stores. Fashion-7The cardigan I also bought last year from Earth Music and Ecology, and it is also something that I reuse time and time again. I love stripes and it goes perfectly with this dress, or any other solid color dress or top in an earth tone (Brown, Blue, Green).   All of these coordinates are combined with black flats and black tights, as the night still get chilly. For work, I cannot wear heels, so I am constantly wearing these black Tory Burch Flats. When the temperature gets warmer, I will stop wearing tights and wear lighter shoes combined with these same outfits until around the end of May. All of these outfits are also conservative enough to wear to a work setting here in Japan, but of course check what your office clothing policy first! Fashion-10   I hope you enjoyed this fashion post! What are some of the trends in this post that you like? Press the like button below and let me know what you think in the comment section!

Japanese Fashion: EATME Harajuku Store Grand Opening – October 26th, 2014

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On October 26th, I went to the grand opening of EATME, a brand by the famous Model Tsubasa Masuwaka. Tsubasa is best known for being a “Gyaru” model in POPTEEN and POPSISTER Magazines (although has graduated from both) and also has two cosmetic lines, Dolly Wink and Candy Doll. She is also a singer under the persona “Milky Bunny”.

EATME is Tsubasa’s first clothing line and has been around since this past summer online at Runway Channel, but the first shop opened in Harajuku just last week. EATME comes from Alice in Wonderland, which my friend Rosie tells me she is a big fan of those kinds of styles. How I would like to describe the style is a bit on the sexy side with some of the shapes of the clothing, but the accents of it make it cute and tone it down by giving it a bit of a conservative, “British” edge. “British” is a trend in clothing in Japan recently, especially for Fall and Winter,  but EATME seems to be different where it fundamentally is based off of the British style, and not just following the trend this year.

Around noon on the 26th, Rosie and I headed over to the shop after eating lunch. She has been a fan of Tsubasa for a long time and she was excited to see the shop. The store was surrounded by flowers from people congratulating the shop on it’s opening, something that is common for shop openings, as well as stage plays and concerts in Japan. When we went to the shop, we thought we were going to have to wait but it ended up that we were given a number and ushered right in after a few minutes. We walked in and the store there was a photo backdrop on the left and a staircase to the right leading up to the second floor.

We then began to look around and just as we were looking at the sweaters on the table at the front of the store, just on the other side was Tsubasa herself! I couldn’t believe it! We were both nervous and we walked around the store for a while looking at the clothes not being able to talk to her, because she was helping other customers. Once Rosie and I decided what we wanted to try on, I went first into the dressing room. I tried on (and eventually bought) a white and blue rose- print dress from the store.

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White and Blue Rose Print Dress by EATME. Photo Taken in Yebisu Garden Place

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While I was changing out of the dress I had tried on, I heard Rosie outside of the dressing room talking with someone. I walked out of the dressing room and found that she was talking to Tsubasa finally! After they talked Rosie went into the dressing room and tried on two dresses. Tsubasa then began talking to me and asked me what dress I was going to buy. She was so nice and gave both Rosie and I advice on how to wear the dresses that we picked out and was interested that we were from a foreign country and joked around with me about letting people in America know about the brand. That day she wasn’t able to take pictures with customers or sign anything, but we were able to shake her hand! It was an amazing experience to be able to talk to the producer of the brand herself and get advice from her on how to wear the items we bought.

At the end, we checked out and took pictures in the picture area at the front of the store and then went to look up stairs. Upstairs contains vintage clothes that aren’t part of the EATME brand and it had a nice boutique feel to it.

Below are parts of the Fall Look Book from the EATME Website. I like the vintage “British” feel to it, as well as it being a bit on the “sexy” and mature side, but also has that touch of cuteness to it. I also particularly like the dresses in the collection.

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All Pictures are credited to the EATME Brand found on the EATME Website

I look forward to seeing more from this brand in the future! It has caught my eye and I can’t wait to see the next collection that comes out.

Check out the brand’s website below! What do you think of it? Tell me in the comments below!

EATME Brand Website

Store Layout and Location Details

 

*I am not affiliated with this brand. This is only my personal report on the event that happened*